James Grotta, MD: Stroke Specialist 

Grotta James for webDo you know the signs of a stroke?

Stroke, the leading cause of serious disability among older Americans, causes dementia as frequently as Alzheimer’s disease and kills someone in the United States about every four minutes.

Dr. James Grotta, former chair of neurology and director of the stroke program at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, will be in PebbleCreek at 10 a.m. Jan. 15 to discuss the causes and warning signs of strokes and what you can do to prevent and even help reverse them.

Grotta  has devoted his career to research in the discovery, testing and application of new therapies for acute strokes and was one of the primary researchers in the study of TPA, the drug that can reverse the effects of stroke if given within three hours of the first symptoms.

He recently created the first mobile stroke unit in the U.S., placing a CT scan on an ambulance, so that patients can be evaluated before they reach the hospital and given TPA or other stroke therapies within the first hour of onset, greatly improving their outcomes. The research includes comparing the effectiveness of a mobile stroke unit versus standard management.

Not all strokes are the same, although all share common symptoms and must be quickly identified if treatment is to be effective. All strokes share the same risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes and pre-diabetes and lack of exercise. And, as the incidence and causes of stroke change as we age, we need to be sure our doctors perform certain tests and prescribe preventive measures every year.

A graduate of Dartmouth College and the University of Virginia Medical School, Grotta did his post-graduate training at the University of Colorado and Massachusetts General Hospital. The editor of several neurology peer-reviewed journals, he has received several awards from the American Heart Association, including Physician of the Year in 2006.

Tickets to all Monday Morning lectures are $4 at the door of the Renaissance Theater.

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