The Health of the Ocean Imperils the Life of the Earth

mitchell for web
Photo by Chloe Ellington O'

Purchase tickets online for this lecture. 

The declining health of the planet's oceans — the place where scientists say life began and where 99 percent of life exists — is an imminent threat to survival on land.

At 7 p.m., Friday, Jan. 12, Alanna Mitchell, the award-winning author of "SEA SICK: The Global Ocean in Crisis," will talk about how humans are affecting the global ocean. The ocean is becoming warm, breathless and sour, and that has big implications for life on the entire planet, she says.

Mitchell, a Canadian journalist, author and playwright, is fascinated with the intersection of science, art and society. She traveled around the world with scientists for three years to find the big picture and to weave the threads of science into a dramatic demonstration of the accelerating crisis in the world’s oceans.  

sea sick coverSome of the carbon dioxide that humans put into the air by burning fossil fuels is being absorbed by the ocean. That puts it into a state it has not been in for millions of years: More acid, warmer, and more prone to vast oxygen-deprived dead zones. At risk is the very structure of life in the ocean and, therefore, on the planet as a whole.

"Sea Sick," her second book, was an international best-seller and won the U.S.-based Grantham Prize for excellence in environmental journalism in 2010. Since then, she has turned it into a one-woman play that she performs internationally.  

She is also the author of  "Invisible Plastic: What Happens When Your Garbage Ends Up in the Ocean," published in 2009. Her fifth book, "The Spinning Magnet," about the Earth’s magnetic field, is set to be published in 2018. 

Tickets to this presentation are $15 per person and will be available online Oct. 1. Tickets may also be purchased at the LLL Center, before any Monday Morning Lecture and may be available at the door of the Renaissance Theater on the evening of the presentation.

Purchase tickets online for this lecture. 

For more information, see: